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Illustration of existing renewable energy generation around the world from  from Carbon Brief and CartoDB

Pathway to Paris #11: Where are we after the Bonn talks?

A biweekly climate briefing for municipalities

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In this Issue #11

  • The last two weeks

  • UN preparatory meeting in the lead up to Paris

  • Countries issue their national targets

  • How can towns and cities contribute to a fair and ambitious climate deal in Paris?

  • New GHGProof pilot

  • Climate vulnerability monitor

  • Climate Publishers Network

  • Featured network: The Climate Vulnerability Network


 

A very eventful two weeks

It has been two weeks since the last newsletter and it seems like a generation, as everything is shifting very quickly. The G7 outlined a plan to phase out fossil fuels by 2100. While this plan is likely insufficient to prevent dangerous climate change, it is the first time that many key leaders have used the word decarbonisation, a shift in the discourse and a signal to investors, as the Guardian describes. Other unanticipated pronouncements: the CEOs of Europe’s largest oil companies including Shell, BP, BG Group, Eni, Statoil and Total wrote to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change requesting an international price on carbon. Chevron and ExxonMobil did not sign the letter. For those of you with kids (or otherwise), check out the Climate Hope City built in Minecraft. The Pope is about to issue an encyclical on climate change. Newspapers launched a pioneering effort to share stories on climate change. A study found that Canada’s GHG emissions cost the world 8,800 lives and $15.4 Billion every year. An IMF analysis found that fossil fuel subsidies totalled $4.9 trillion (6.5 percent of global GDP) in 2013. Eliminating these subsidies in 2015 could raise government revenue by $2.9 trillion (3.6 percent of global GDP), cut global CO2 emissions by more than 20 percent, and cut premature air pollution deaths by more than half.

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Putting a Price on Carbon

From our one of our Office of Research Projects: MC3

Canada’s Ecofiscal Commission has released a report outlining how Canada can quickly and efficiently reduce carbon emissions. Their proposal? Every province in Canada should put a price on carbon. They argue that “strong provincial carbon pricing policies… make good economic sense for every province—and for Canada as a whole. Designing those policies to recognize essential economic differences as well as different provincial priorities is nothing more than practical.” The report echoes the number one policy orientation of the Sustainable Canada Dialogue, Acting on Climate Change.

The success of the BC Carbon Tax provides evidence that putting a price on carbon can reduce emissions without adversely affecting the economy. Furthermore, the fact that Quebec and Alberta, with their disparate political cultures and economic foundations, have both adopted carbon pricing, demonstrates that policies can be tailored to the provincial context, achieving carbon reductions efficiently.
– See more at: http://www.mc-3.ca/blog/putting-price-carbon#sthash.kqw70vvI.dpuf

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